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Fishing the tidal creeks in winter.

Fishing the tidal creeks of the Caloosahatchie river.

I like to change tactics in the winter and do some fishing the tidal creeks in winter. I like to change my approach to fishing for snook. As most seasoned fisherman know snook are highly migratory.In the sense that they will move from creeks and backcountry haunts in the spring. To the passes and inlets of the Florida coasts.As winter sets in they reverse their travels to tidal creeks and rivers. And also the canal systems all over central and south Florida.

The key is finding deeper water. That the water temp is at a minium of 60 degrees or higher. At 60 degrees snook tend not to feed as much as in higher water temps. Most of the feeder creeks that come into the river. Are deeper at around 10 to 12ft.

On warm days I like to throw top water minnow imitation such as the Rapala. In the black and gold color. If that gets no responce I switch to bucktail jigs.And lures such as the Snook slayer or the Ultra bucktail. I work the jigs slow at first to see what the fish are looking for.I like the darker colors such as black head with a brown body or a blue body.Dont discount the fact you just might get a bass or two in the mix.

To get more complete I work the jigs slow at first. To see what the fish are looking for.I like the darker colors such as black head with a brown body or a blue body.Dont discount the fact. You just might get a bass or two in the mix.info check out my E-book.

So you don’t have to stop fishing for snook in the winter. You just have to change tactics.Fishing the tidal creeks in winter can pay off in big ways.Thanks and I hope this helps you catch more and bigger fish.

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Fishing at the Power plants

The winter temps can make the water to cold for fish so I go fishing at the power plants.

As most seasoned saltwater fishermen know when the winter chill takes the water temp down. Around 70 degrees saltwater species will head to the power plant outflows.So fishing at the power plants can be hot. Here they can bask in the warm water coming out of the power plant.The outflows can concentrate the fish in a confined area making them easier targets.

Live shrimp are by far the best bait. Because generally the greenbacks are gone so shrimp work good on all species.I explain this in detail in my e-book Central Florida Fishing. Power plants have a barrier rope. With floats to prevent boats from going further up the outflow.The fishing gear you can use is a oval slipfloat with a rubber stopper to the depth you choose.Tie on a swivel about 12″ to 16″ above 1/0 size hook and a egg sinker on the swivel.Ususally I use a 1/0 to 2/0 hook.

Well going to try over at the Apollo Bend Power plant. And see what happens outside the preserve.Keep your lines wet and I’ll see you on the water.

The species of fish encountered can be wide. There is seatrout,pomano,bluefish,sheepshead,redfish,flounder,mangrove snapper, and snook. To name a few. I fished the Anclote power plant with good success on all the species here except for the snook. The outflow is on the north side. So all you do is pull up to the rope barrier and tie off and start fishing.

You can launch your boat at the county ram on the south side of the power plant and cruise around to the north side. That’s where the out flow is. So next time your sitting around in winter time get out and fish at the power plants.

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